Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Maps & Graphs - Nordregio

From: http://www.nordregio.se/Maps--Graphs/?utm_source=Nordregio+News&utm_campaign=dd5c61aa13-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_3667666de8-dd5c61aa13-276726189#

Maps & Graphs

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Tuesday, December 17, 2013

OECD Regions at a Glance 2013

From DOI:10.1787/reg_glance-2013-en

Regions at a Glance 2013 showcases the contribution of regions to stronger, fairer and cleaner economies, drawing both on the latest comparable data and on past trends across regions in OECD countries.

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Sweden 4th in Global Energy Architecture Performance Index 2014 - World Economic Forum

From: http://reports.weforum.org/global-energy-architecture-performance-index-2014/view/global-rankings/


4. Sweden – 0.72
Sweden is the fourth highest performer across the EAPI, receiving its best score in the environmental sustainability dimension, ranking in second place after France. Sweden’s energy sector is defined by its nuclear generating capacity, and a policy and investment focus on renewable energy sources, both in power generation and in the transportation sector. In the 1980s, the Swedish government stated its intent to decommission existing nuclear capacity. However, this policy was repealed in 2010, and there are now life-extension and reactor expansions underway. Nevertheless, Sweden imposes high taxes on nuclear power. In 2009, Sweden’s Climate and Energy Policy outlined the goals of a fossil-fuel independent vehicle fleet by 2030, and net zero GHG emissions by 2050. The policy framework to support the realization of these targets is in part driven by overarching EU energy policies, and partly specific to Sweden’s goals. For example, Sweden leads the way in transport, with a blend of fiscal incentives for the purchase of flexible fuel vehicles and congestion charge systems in urban centres.


Sunday, December 8, 2013

How different countries’ students measure up (surprising results for Canada, Sweden and Finland) - Economist

From The Economist Daily Chart: Dec 3rd 2013, 17:07 by K.N.C., P.K. and P.J.W.

TEST scores are not everything. But they do signal something. By this measure (taken by testing 15 year olds on basic academic skills) industrious Asians have maintained their lead over Americans and Europeans, according to the latest PISA ranking, the Programme for International Student Assessment run by the OECD. Strikingly, the city of Shanghai, China and Singapore are among the top (though test scores do not exist for earlier years, so they are not compared with, for example, 2006). America yet again lags on performance, though it has made some advances on more equitable access to education. The usefulness of PISA rankings is not so much about placement but about changes and what that tells us about the successes or otherwise of education reforms. Some countries have made gains like Slovenia and Spain. Some surprising tumblers include Canada, Sweden and Finland (largely due to poorer maths outcomes). Every three years around half a million pupils are tested per country; the latest study saw about 60 participate. Critics will point out the rankings have imperfections. But it gives us a clue to how successful our classrooms are—and that is hard to ignore.



See a representaion of the data by actual score in our other PISA infographic here.

Monday, November 4, 2013

Indicators to support the Europe 2020 strategy

Europe 2020, a strategy for jobs and smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, is based on five EU headline targets which are currently measured by eight headline indicators. EU and national targets are available in the data tables. Additional information can be found on theEurope 2020 Website.

From: http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_OFFPUB/KS-02-13-238/EN/KS-02-13-238-EN.PDF





Friday, October 25, 2013

Few European regions reach the overall EU target on R&D expenditure

From: http://www.espon.eu/export/sites/default/Documents/Publications/ATLAS2020/194650_ESPON_ATLAS_-_Final_version.pdf

In understanding the territorial dimension of Europe 2020, this Atlas illustrates major trends, potentials and challenges facing European regions and cities (for a selected number of indicators - one example below).


Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Eurostat - Sweden and Eurozone same yearly increase in government debt ratio

From: http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_PUBLIC/2-23102013-AP/EN/2-23102013-AP-EN.PDF

Compared with the second quarter of 2012, twenty-four Member States registered an increase in their debt to GDP ratio at the end of the second quarter of 2013, and four a decrease. Sweden (SE) and Eurozone countries (EA17) show about the same increase in their government debt ratio.



Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Sweden ranks top of the Global AgeWatch Index

From: http://www.helpage.org/global-agewatch/data/global-rankings-table/

AgeWatch report card: Sweden

Global AgeWatch rank

1out of 91
Global AgeWatch value
89.9
Shows how near a country is to the ideal value of 100.
Total population
9.5 million
Population over 60
2.4 million
% of population over 60
25.4%

Overview

Sweden ranks top of the Global AgeWatch Index. In 1913, it introduced the world's first universal social pension scheme. The 100 year-celebration underlines that many years of development of social welfare is behind Sweden's ranking on the Index.
About half of Sweden's elderly are members in one of the five national pensioners’ organisations. Over the years they have been strong advocates for the rights of older people.
Indexes built on aggregated national data do not take into account economic, gender, social and other inequalities. At present pensioners’ organisations are concerned that the economic gap between pensioners and wage-earners is increasing. They strongly oppose the widening of this gap due to a tax system that puts higher taxes on income from pensions than on corresponding income from salaries.

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Eurostat - Inactivity rates of old persons (SE=Sweden)

From: http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/statistics_explained/index.php/People_outside_the_labour_market
The inactivity rates of men aged 55-64 years were lowest in Sweden (29.1 %) and Germany (26.4 %). On the women’s side, the inactivity rates were  as low as 27.0 % in Sweden, 35.3 % in Estonia and 37.9 % in Finland. Inactivity rates are particularly low in Iceland: only 12.9 % of men and 22.0 % of women in this age group are inactive.


Figure 6: Inactivity rates of older persons (55-64) by sex and main reason for not looking for a job, 2012
Source: Eurostat (lfsa_igar)

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Eurostat - Inactivity rates of young persons (SE=Sweden)

From: http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/statistics_explained/index.php/People_outside_the_labour_market


Figure 3: Inactivity rates of young persons (15-24) by sex and main reason for not looking for a job, 2012
(*) No reasons information for France
Source: Eurostat (lfsa_igar)

Monday, September 9, 2013

Eurostat - New Regional Datasets

Publish Date : 06-SEP-2013
Theme : General and regional statistics
Publish Date : 06-SEP-2013
Theme : General and regional statistics
Publish Date : 06-SEP-2013
Theme : General and regional statistics
Publish Date : 06-SEP-2013
Theme : General and regional statistics
Publish Date : 06-SEP-2013
Theme : General and regional statistics
Publish Date : 06-SEP-2013
Theme : General and regional statistics
Publish Date : 06-SEP-2013
Theme : General and regional statistics
Publish Date : 06-SEP-2013
Theme : General and regional statistics
Publish Date : 06-SEP-2013
Theme : General and regional statistics
Publish Date : 06-SEP-2013
Theme : General and regional statistics
Publish Date : 06-SEP-2013
Theme : General and regional statistics
Publish Date : 04-SEP-2013
Theme : Industry, trade and services

Friday, August 30, 2013

Slate - Immigrants Don’t Drain Public Coffers After All

By Joshua Keating
Posted Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013, at 5:17 PM
One major argument used by opponents of looser immigration laws is that immigrants—particularly low-skilled workers—will impose a fiscal burden on their new countries, taking advantage of rich countries’ generous welfare states while contributing little in taxes.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s 2013 International Migration Outlook (via Michael Clemens) takes an in depth look at the fiscal impact of immigration on the 34 OECD member countries, finding “an overall fiscal impact in terms of GDP that is positive but small”:

Depending on the assumptions made and the methodology used, estimates of the fiscal impact of immigration vary, although in most countries it tends to be very small in terms of GDP and is around zero on average across the OECD countries considered. The impact, whether positive or negative, rarely exceeds 0.5% of GDP in a given year. 
The following chart shows the net fiscal position of immigrant households in these countries, meaning their taxes and social security contributions minus the social transfers they receive:

For the countries where the contribution is negative, the reports suggests this is because their “immigrant populations are relatively old and thus overrepresented among the population receiving pensions.” In the case of Ireland, the negative contribution applies to both immigrant and native-born households following the country’s economic crisis.