Wednesday, January 30, 2013

The Economist - Sweden low inequality among selected countries


Daily chart: For the first time in 12 years, China this month officially reported its Gini coefficient for income. Zero means perfect equality and 1.0 means one person takes all. Today’s videographic compares China’s score against select countries. View videographic here: http://econ.st/T63JLe
Daily chart: For the first time in 12 years, China this month officially reported its Gini coefficient for income. Zero means perfect equality and 1.0 means one person takes all. Today’s videographic compares China’s score against select countries. View videographic here:  http://econ.st/T63JLe

Monday, January 14, 2013

Eurostat: Swedes in top among Europeans who used the internet on mobile devices

From: http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_OFFPUB/KS-SF-12-050/EN/KS-SF-12-050-EN.PDF

The shares for individuals who used portable computers or handheld devices through a mobile phone network or wireless connection away from home or work were above 50 % in six Member States: Denmark, Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Finland and Sweden (SE).






Note: EU27 without UK
Source: Eurostat (online data codes: isoc_ci_ifp_iu, isoc_cimobi_dev)

Friday, January 11, 2013

Tackling income inequality: The role of taxes and transfers


  Tackling income inequality | OECD Free preview | Powered by Keepeek Digital Asset Management Solution

OECD Journal: Economic Studies, Volume 2012 Issue 1

DOI: 10.1787/eco_studies-2012-5k95xd6l65lt

Taxes and transfers reduce inequality in disposable income relative to market income. The effect varies, however, across OECD countries. The redistributive impact of taxes and transfers depends on the size, mix and the progressivity of each component. Some countries with a relatively small tax and welfare system (e.g. Australia) achieve the same redistributive impact as countries characterised by much higher taxes and transfers (e.g. Germany) because they rely more on income taxes, which are more progressive than other taxes, and on means-tested cash transfers. This article provides an assessment of the redistributive effect of the main taxes and cash transfers, based on various OECD data sources, a set of policy indicators and a literature review. Using cluster analysis, it also identifies empirically four groups of countries with tax and transfer systems that share broadly similar features.

Economic Returns on Education - OECD Comparisons

From: http://www.oecd.org/newsroom/oecdannounceswinnerofglobaldatavisualizationcompetition.htm


Tuesday, January 1, 2013

Economist: Birth right - Sweden fourth

From: Jan 1st 2013, 14:14 by Economist.com

Where to be born in 2013
A QUARTER of a century ago, The World in 1988 light-heartedly ranked 50 countries according to where would be the best place to be born. Then, America came top (see chart on left). Now the Economist Intelligence Unit has more earnestly calculated where would be best to be born in 2013. Its quality-of-life index links the results of subjective life-satisfaction surveys—how happy people say they are—to objective determinants of the quality of life across countries. Being rich helps more than anything else, but it is not all that counts—things like crime and trust in public institutions matter too. In all, the index takes 11 indicators into account. Some are fixed, such as geography; others change only very slowly over time (demography, social and cultural characteristics). See full article.